COFFEE: Overview, Uses, Side Effects, Precautions, Interactions, Dosing and Reviews (2023)

Table of Contents
Overview How does it work ? Side Effects Special Precautions and Warnings Interactions ? Major Interaction Ephedrine interacts with COFFEE Moderate Interaction Adenosine (Adenocard) interacts with COFFEE Alendronate (Fosamax) interacts with COFFEE Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with COFFEE Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with COFFEE Cimetidine (Tagamet) interacts with COFFEE Clozapine (Clozaril) interacts with COFFEE Dipyridamole (Persantine) interacts with COFFEE Disulfiram (Antabuse) interacts with COFFEE Estrogens interacts with COFFEE Fluvoxamine (Luvox) interacts with COFFEE Levothyroxine (Synthroid, others) interacts with COFFEE Lithium interacts with COFFEE Medications for depression (MAOIs) interacts with COFFEE Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with COFFEE Pentobarbital (Nembutal) interacts with COFFEE Phenylpropanolamine interacts with COFFEE Riluzole (Rilutek) interacts with COFFEE Stimulant drugs interacts with COFFEE Theophylline interacts with COFFEE Verapamil (Calan, others) interacts with COFFEE Medications for asthma (Beta-adrenergic agonists) interacts with COFFEE Nicotine interacts with COFFEE Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with COFFEE Minor Interaction Alcohol (Ethanol) interacts with COFFEE Fluconazole (Diflucan) interacts with COFFEE Medications for depression (Tricyclic antidepressants) interacts with COFFEE Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with COFFEE Mexiletine (Mexitil) interacts with COFFEE Phenothiazines interacts with COFFEE Terbinafine (Lamisil) interacts with COFFEE Dosing FAQs Videos

Overview

Coffee is a popular drink made from the roasted beans of Coffea fruits (Coffea arabica, Coffea canephora). It contains caffeine and chlorogenic acid.

The caffeine in coffee works by stimulating the central nervous system (CNS), heart, and muscles. Chlorogenic acid might affect blood vessels and how the body handles blood sugar and metabolism.

People most commonly drink coffee to increase mental alertness. Coffee is also used for diabetes, cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, dementia, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

Don't confuse coffee with other caffeine sources, such as green coffee, black tea, and green tea. These are not the same.

How does it work ?

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Coffee is commonly consumed as a beverage. Drinking coffee in moderate amounts (about 4 cups daily) is likely safe for most people.

Drinking more than 4 cups of coffee daily is possibly unsafe. Drinking large amounts might cause side effects due to the caffeine content. These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache and irregular heartbeat.

When given as an enema (rectally): Coffee is possibly unsafe. Coffee enemas have been linked to cases of severe side effects, including death.

Special Precautions and Warnings

Pregnancy: Drinking moderate amounts of coffee during pregnancy is possibly safe. Do not drink more than 3 cups of coffee daily. This provides about 300 mg of caffeine. Consuming more than this during pregnancy is possibly unsafe and has been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage, increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and other negative effects, including symptoms of caffeine withdrawal in newborns and a lower birth weight.

Breast-feeding: Drinking 1-2 cups of coffee daily while breast-feeding is possibly safe. But drinking larger amounts is possibly unsafe. The caffeine in coffee is passed into breastmilk. It might cause irritability and increased bowel movements in nursing infants.

Children: Caffeinated coffee is possibly safe in children when consumed in the normal amounts found in food and beverages.

Anxiety disorders: The caffeine in coffee might make anxiety worse.

Bipolar disorder: The caffeine in coffee might make symptoms of mania worse.

Bleeding disorders: The caffeine in coffee might slow blood clotting and make bleeding disorders worse.

Heart disease: Drinking coffee on a daily basis doesn't seem to increase the risk for serious complications from heart disease. But people who smoke and have heart disease might have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they consume coffee daily.

Diabetes: The caffeine in coffee might affect blood sugar. Use coffee with caution if you have diabetes.

Diarrhea: The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.

Seizures: Coffee contains caffeine. People with epilepsy should avoid using caffeine in high doses. Low doses of caffeine should be used cautiously.

Glaucoma: Drinking caffeinated coffee increases pressure inside the eye. The increase starts within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes. If you have glaucoma, drink coffee with caution.

High blood pressure: Drinking caffeinated coffee might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. But this doesn't seem to occur in people who drink caffeinated products regularly.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Coffee contains caffeine. The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, may worsen diarrhea and other symptoms of IBS.

Loss of bladder control: Coffee contains caffeine. Caffeine can make bladder control worse by increasing frequency of urination and the urge to urinate.

(Video) trazodone 50 mg uses dosage and side effects

Smoking: People who smoke and drink coffee might have an increased risk of dying from heart disease or cancer.

Thinning bones (osteoporosis): Drinking caffeinated coffee can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. This might weaken bones. If you have osteoporosis, don't drink more than 3 cups of coffee daily. If you are generally healthy and get enough calcium from your food or supplements, drinking about 4 cups of coffee daily doesn't seem to increase the risk of getting osteoporosis.

(Video) Which medications should you NOT be taking with coffee? 7 drugs examined

Interactions ?

    Major Interaction

    Do not take this combination

  • Ephedrine interacts with COFFEE

    Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. Caffeine, which is found in coffee, and ephedrine are both stimulant drugs. Drinking coffee and taking ephedrine might cause too much stimulation and sometimes serious side effects and heart problems. Do not take caffeine-containing products and ephedrine at the same time.

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Adenosine (Adenocard) interacts with COFFEE

    The caffeine in coffee might block the effects of adenosine, which is used to do a test called a cardiac stress test. Stop consuming coffee or other caffeine-containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test.

  • Alendronate (Fosamax) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee can decrease how much alendronate the body absorbs. Taking coffee and alendronate at the same time can decrease the effects of alendronate. Don't drink coffee within two hours of taking alendronate.

  • Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Some antibiotics might decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking these antibiotics along with coffee might increase the risk of side effects including jitteriness, headache, increased heart rate, and other side effects.

  • Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Birth control pills can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. This might increase the risk for side effects from caffeine, such as jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.

  • Cimetidine (Tagamet) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Cimetidine can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking cimetidine along with coffee might increase the chance of caffeine side effects including jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.

  • Clozapine (Clozaril) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down clozapine to get rid of it. The caffeine in coffee might decrease how fast the body breaks down clozapine. Taking coffee along with clozapine can increase the effects and side effects of clozapine.

  • Dipyridamole (Persantine) interacts with COFFEE

    The caffeine in coffee might block the effects of dipyridamole. Dipyridamole is often used by doctors to do a test on the heart called a cardiac stress test. Stop drinking coffee or other caffeine-containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test.

  • Disulfiram (Antabuse) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Disulfiram can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. Taking coffee along with disulfiram might increase the risk of caffeine side effects, including jitteriness, irritability, and fast heartbeat.

    (Video) Oral Dosage For Methylene Blue - FLCCC Protocol Review

  • Estrogens interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Estrogens can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking estrogen along with coffee can increase the risk of side effects such as jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.

  • Fluvoxamine (Luvox) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Fluvoxamine can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking caffeine along with fluvoxamine might increase the risk of caffeine side effects.

  • Levothyroxine (Synthroid, others) interacts with COFFEE

    Drinking coffee might reduce the amount of levothyroxine that is absorbed when taken by mouth. This can decrease how well levothyroxine works. Avoid drinking coffee for at least an hour after taking levothyroxine.

  • Lithium interacts with COFFEE

    The caffeine in coffee can increase how quickly the body gets rid of lithium. If you take products that contain caffeine and you take lithium, don't stop drinking coffee suddenly. Instead, slowly reduce intake of coffee. Stopping caffeine too quickly can increase the side effects of lithium.

  • Medications for depression (MAOIs) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. There is some concern that caffeine can interact with certain medications, called MAOIs. If caffeine is taken with these medications, it might increase the risk for serious side effects including fast heartbeat and very high blood pressure.

    Some common MAOIs include phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate).

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee might slow blood clotting. Taking coffee along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

  • Pentobarbital (Nembutal) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. The stimulant effects of caffeine can block the sleep-producing effects of pentobarbital.

  • Phenylpropanolamine interacts with COFFEE

    The caffeine in coffee can stimulate the body. Phenylpropanolamine can also stimulate the body. Taking caffeine and phenylpropanolamine together might cause too much stimulation and increase heartbeat, blood pressure, and cause nervousness.

  • Riluzole (Rilutek) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down riluzole to get rid of it. Drinking coffee can decrease how fast the body breaks down riluzole. This can increase the effects and side effects of riluzole.

  • Stimulant drugs interacts with COFFEE

    Stimulants, such as amphetamines and cocaine, speed up the nervous system. By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can increase blood pressure and speed up the heartbeat. Coffee contains caffeine. Caffeine can also speed up the nervous system. Taking coffee along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure.

  • Theophylline interacts with COFFEE

    The caffeine in coffee works similarly to theophylline. Caffeine can also decrease how quickly the body gets rid of theophylline. Drinking coffee and taking theophylline might increase the effects and side effects of theophylline.

  • Verapamil (Calan, others) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Verapamil can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. Drinking coffee and taking verapamil can increase the risk of caffeine side effects including jitteriness, and fast heartbeat.

  • Medications for asthma (Beta-adrenergic agonists) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. Caffeine can stimulate the heart. Some medications for asthma can also stimulate the heart. Taking caffeine with some medications for asthma might cause too much stimulation and cause heart problems.

    (Video) Kratom Tea - Everything you need to know - Dangers, Benefits & Side effects

  • Nicotine interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. Taking coffee along with nicotine might cause a fast heartbeat and increase blood pressure.

  • Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. Caffeine, especially in large amounts, can reduce potassium levels in the body. "Water pills" can also decrease potassium levels in the body. Taking large amounts of caffeine along with "water pills" might decrease potassium levels too much.

    Minor Interaction

    Be watchful with this combination

  • Alcohol (Ethanol) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Alcohol can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking coffee along with alcohol might increase the risk of caffeine side effects including jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.

  • Fluconazole (Diflucan) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Fluconazole might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. Taking fluconazole and drinking coffee might increase the risk of caffeine side effects, including jitteriness and fast heartbeat.

  • Medications for depression (Tricyclic antidepressants) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains chemicals called tannins. Tannins can bind to certain medications for depression (tricyclic antidepressants) and decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. To avoid this interaction, avoid coffee one hour before and two hours after taking these medications.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee might increase blood sugar levels. Taking coffee along with diabetes medications might reduce the effects of these medications. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

  • Mexiletine (Mexitil) interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Mexiletine can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking mexiletine along with coffee might increase the risk of caffeine side effects.

  • Phenothiazines interacts with COFFEE

    Coffee contains chemicals called tannins. Tannins can bind to phenothiazines and decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. To avoid this interaction, avoid coffee one hour before and two hours after taking these medications.

  • Terbinafine (Lamisil) interacts with COFFEE

    The body breaks down the caffeine in coffee to get rid of it. Terbinafine can decrease how fast the body gets rid of caffeine and increase the risk of caffeine side effects including jitteriness and fast heartbeat.

Dosing

Coffee is commonly consumed by adults as a beverage, typically in amounts of 2 cups daily. This provides about 250 mg of caffeine. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

(Video) 🔴 Duloxetine Side Effects Dosage Uses Warnings and Interactions

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.

FAQs

What are the side effects of coffee and? ›

You drink more than 4 cups of coffee a day
  • Headache.
  • Insomnia.
  • Nervousness.
  • Irritability.
  • Frequent urination or inability to control urination.
  • Fast heartbeat.
  • Muscle tremors.

What are some of the benefits and side effects to drinking coffee? ›

Low to moderate doses of caffeine (50–300 mg) may cause increased alertness, energy, and ability to concentrate, while higher doses may have negative effects such as anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, and increased heart rate. [2] Still, the cumulative research on coffee points in the direction of a health benefit.

What drug does coffee interact with? ›

Alonzo: The medications that can interact with caffeine come from 3 main classes: antibiotics, estrogen-containing medications and medications that slow blood clotting, such as anticoagulants and antiplatelets. Certain types of antibiotics known as quinolones can interact with caffeine.

What are the good effects of coffee? ›

What are the top health benefits of drinking coffee?
  • You could live longer. ...
  • Your body may process glucose (or sugar) better. ...
  • You're less likely to develop heart failure. ...
  • You are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease. ...
  • Your liver will thank you. ...
  • Your DNA will be stronger.

What are the long term side effects of coffee? ›

Long-term effects at this level may include chronic insomnia, constant anxiety, depression, and stomach problems. It can also cause high blood pressure or make high blood pressure worse. More than 300 mg of caffeine (about 2 to 3 cups of coffee) in a day may be linked to miscarriages and low-birth weight babies.

Can coffee cause high blood pressure? ›

Caffeine may cause a short, but dramatic increase in your blood pressure, even if you don't have high blood pressure. It's unclear what causes this spike in blood pressure. The blood pressure response to caffeine differs from person to person.

Is coffee good for the Kidneys? ›

Studies also show that coffee has protective effects on the kidneys, thanks to antioxidants. Drinking coffee is associated with a lower risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Can coffee cause kidney problems? ›

Research has not shown that drinking 3-4 cups of coffee a day increases the risk of kidney disease or increases rate of decline of kidney function. However, moderating how much coffee you drink is a good idea. Those struggling with blood pressure control should especially drink less than three cups per day.

Is coffee good for the heart? ›

Heart health benefits

Coffee is full of health benefits. According to the American College of Cardiology, drinking two to three cups of coffee per day is associated with maintaining a healthy heart.

What does coffee do to your brain? ›

Caffeine is a stimulant, which means it increases activity in your brain and nervous system. It also increases the circulation of chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline in the body. In small doses, caffeine can make you feel refreshed and focused.

Can you take blood pressure medicine with coffee? ›

As long as caffeine is in your bloodstream, it will reduce the effectiveness of your blood pressure medication and increase your overall blood pressure reading.

Who should not drink coffee? ›

"If you regularly experience anxiety or panic attacks, you may want to consider avoiding or reducing your caffeinated coffee intake." Research from General Hospital Psychiatry found that higher levels of caffeine (around 5 cups of coffee per day) could potentially bring on panic attacks in those with existing anxiety.

Does caffeine cause hair loss? ›

The short answer is - No, it's not true! Caffeine does not cause hair loss when applied on the scalp but here's what's important – it must be used in moderation.

Can caffeine affect your body? ›

It can affect your sleep, digestion, blood pressure, and heart rate. Children should be careful, as well. Too much caffeine can damage a child's developing heart, blood vessels, and nervous system. So make sure to keep track of how much you -- and your children -- get.

Is coffee good for high blood pressure? ›

Some research suggests coffee can lower the risk for high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in people who don't already have it. But drinking too much coffee has been shown to raise blood pressure and lead to anxiety, heart palpitations and trouble sleeping.

What are 10 benefits of coffee? ›

10 coffee benefits
  • Enhanced energy levels.
  • Reduced body fat.
  • Increased physical activity.
  • Reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes.
  • Reduced risk of liver disease.
  • Reduced risk of Alzheimer's.
  • Reduced risk of Parkinson's.
  • Enhanced heart health.
Mar 15, 2022

Can coffee cause inflammation? ›

Research suggests that coffee does not cause inflammation in most people—even if your norm is more than one or two caffeinated cups. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Coffee may have anti-inflammatory effects in the body.

What happens when you start drinking coffee everyday? ›

Hu said that moderate coffee intake—about 2–5 cups a day—is linked to a lower likelihood of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, liver and endometrial cancers, Parkinson's disease, and depression. It's even possible that people who drink coffee can reduce their risk of early death.

What happens when you stop drinking coffee? ›

Withdrawal Symptoms

These include headache, tiredness, sleepiness, down moods, trouble concentrating, and crankiness. You'll start to feel symptoms a day or two after you stop. They can last anywhere from 2 to 9 days.

How many cups of coffee a day is healthy? ›

As a general rule, you can assume that an average 8-ounce (240-ml) cup of coffee offers around 100 mg of caffeine. Several sources suggest that 400 mg of caffeine per day — the equivalent of 4 cups (945 ml) of coffee — is safe for most healthy adults ( 3 , 5 ).

What happens to your body when you drink coffee everyday? ›

Central nervous system

You'll feel more awake and less tired, so it's a common ingredient in medications to treat or manage drowsiness, headaches, and migraines. Studies have also found that people who drink coffee regularly have a lower risk of developing Alzheimer's and dementia, and cut suicide risk by 45 percent.

What happens if you drink coffee all day everyday? ›

“Coffee can cause insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, upset stomach, nausea, and vomiting, increased heart rate and breathing rate, and other side effects,” Rissetto says. “Consuming large amounts of coffee might also cause headache, anxiety, agitation, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeat.”

What happens to your body if you drink too much coffee everyday? ›

However, too much caffeine may cause headaches, anxiety, trouble sleeping, irritability, respiratory issues, chest pain, thirst, and frequent urination. Certain people may be more sensitive to caffeine and may see these effects at even lower doses.

Videos

1. Dandelion Leaf Extract Reduces ACE2 and SARS-COV-2 Spike Binding | In-vitro Study
(Drbeen Medical Lectures)
2. Daily Aspirin - Should You Take It? Cardiologist explains.
(Talking With Docs)
3. Brilinta Uses, Dosage and Side Effects.
(MedArchive)
4. Diazepam ( Valium 10mg ): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, interactions and some ADVICE
(Medical Videos [ ANIMATED ])
5. What is Benefits of Caralluma Fimbriata: Reviews and Side effects
(Thera Planet)
6. Eliquis (apixaban): Warnings, Dosage, Side effects, Interactions
(Dr. Warraich Health & Food Channel)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Stevie Stamm

Last Updated: 01/24/2023

Views: 6506

Rating: 5 / 5 (80 voted)

Reviews: 95% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Stevie Stamm

Birthday: 1996-06-22

Address: Apt. 419 4200 Sipes Estate, East Delmerview, WY 05617

Phone: +342332224300

Job: Future Advertising Analyst

Hobby: Leather crafting, Puzzles, Leather crafting, scrapbook, Urban exploration, Cabaret, Skateboarding

Introduction: My name is Stevie Stamm, I am a colorful, sparkling, splendid, vast, open, hilarious, tender person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.